• Have Diabetes – Related Complications Declined?

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    Diabetes is in the list of the top deadly diseases to afflict mankind because it can cause serious health outcomes, including heart attack, stroke and kidney failure.

    But new research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a ray of hope that five major complications related to diabetes have declined, at least in the US, during the last 20 years.

    Statistics About Diabetes

    Data from the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet (released Jan. 26, 2011)

    Total prevalence of diabetes

    Total: 25.8 million children and adults in the United States—8.3% of the population—have diabetes.

    Diagnosed: 18.8 million people

    Undiagnosed: 7.0 million people

    Prediabetes: 79 million people*

    New Cases: 1.9 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older in 2010.

    – See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/#sthash.glIixNQH.dpuf

     

    What about the Rest of the World? And, is the future going to be better or worse?

    Here are some hair – raising statistics on diabetes for the Rest of the World:

    some hair - raising statistics on diabetes for the Rest of the World:

    Here are some hair – raising statistics on diabetes for the Rest of the World:

    The prevalence reflects the population – size.

    The picture below shows the prevalence of diabetes in different regions of the world, depicted in a bar diagram:

    The picture shows the prevalence of diabetes in different regions of the world, depicted in a bar diagram:

    The proportion of the population who have diabetes is much higher, in fact in the MENA region than even the SEA and North American region, due mainly to lifestyle issues.

    The proportion of the population who have diabetes is much higher, in fact in the MENA region than even the SEA and North American region, due mainly to lifestyle issues.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This is a vivid picture of what is likely to happen given current trends:A 55 % increase in world – wide prevalence of diabetes

    This picture paints a vivid picture of what is likely to happen given current trends:

    • A 55 % increase in world – wide prevalence of diabetes
    • In Africa and the MENA region, the increase is close to a 100%, which means the Diabetes population size is set to double!
    • South-East Asia is going to see a 70% increase in the prevalence of diabetes.

    • In Africa and the MENA region, the increase is close to a 100%, which means the Diabetes population size is set to double!
    • South-East Asia is going to see a 70% increase in the prevalence of diabetes.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This picture gives one an idea of what proportion of deaths are due to diabetes – related complications.

    This picture gives one an idea of what proportion of deaths are due to diabetes - related complications.

    As you can see, in the MENA, SEA and Africa regions, the figure is above 50 %, which is a definite indication that Diabetes is really deadly in these populations – possibly due to inadequate access to health care, ignorance, improper diet, lack of physical exercise, etc.

     

     

     

     

    As you can see, in the MENA, SEA and Africa regions, the figure is above 50 %, which is a definite indication that Diabetes is really deadly in these populations – possibly due to inadequate access to health care, ignorance, improper diet, lack of physical exercise, etc.

    Complications

    Heart disease and stroke

    • In 2004, heart disease was noted on 68% of diabetes-related death certificates among people aged 65 years or older.
    • In 2004, stroke was noted on 16% of diabetes-related death certificates among people aged 65 years or older.
    • Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes.
    • The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes.

    – See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/#sthash.glIixNQH.dpuf

     

    Kidney disease

    • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for 44% of new cases in 2008.
    • In 2008, 48,374 people with diabetes began treatment for end-stage kidney disease in the United States.
    • In 2008, a total of 202,290 people with end-stage kidney disease due to diabetes were living on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant in the United States.

    – See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/#sthash.glIixNQH.dpuf

     

    Amputation

    • More than 60% of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations occur in people with diabetes.
    • In 2006, about 65,700 non-traumatic lower-limb amputations were performed in people with diabetes.

    – See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/#sthash.glIixNQH.dpuf

     

    Finally, some good news!

    Here is an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine, titled Changes in Diabetes-Related Complications in the United States, 1990–2010

     

    The authors used data from different US national agencies and compared the incidences of lower-limb amputation, end-stage renal disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and death from hyperglycemic (high blood glucose) crisis between 1990 and 2010.

    They found that the rates of ALL 5 complications declined between 1990 and 2010.

    The highest relative declines were seen in heart attack and death from high blood glucose crises.

    Even Stroke and Amputations declined by up to 50%.

    They concluded that the rates of these complications have declined, but the prevalence of people with diabetes is increasing steadily, so the global burden of the disease as well as it’s complications is increasing relentlessly.

    Lead author for this study, Edward Gregg, says: “These findings show that we have come a long way in preventing complications and improving quality of life for people with diabetes. While the declines in complications are good news, they are still high and will stay with us unless we can make substantial progress in preventing type 2 diabetes.”

     

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