• Headache – FAQs

    I’m 20 years boy and I’m suffering from severe headache it starts during night about 11 pm and continue till 3 am. Basically at night and headache in back side of head feeling like hammering in my back head ,also feel weak in morning and can’t sleep at night .Plzz help.

    This is a question asked on another public forum; to read my answer on this, go here.


    What causes headaches every day?

    Headaches that occur frequently and daily may simply be migraines which have become worse; but if it is a new headache, or there is a significant change in your headache pattern, then you need to take it more seriously. This was a question asked on http://www.quora.com To read the full answer, click here.


    What does a headache occurring often and in the same place on the head mean?

    Headaches that always affect the same spot on the head could herald a sinister cause inside the head; they should be evaluated properly. This was a question asked on http://www.quora.com To read the full answer, click here.,


    Is it common for migraine sufferers to have non headache migraines?

    Yes, there are a variety of migraines, and you can even have one without headache! This was a question asked on http://www.quora.com To read the full answer, click here.


    Why do I have headaches above my left eye frequently?

    Above the eye, sinus and eye conditions would have to be considered first, followed by local conditions. This was a question asked on http://www.quora.com To read the full answer, click here.

    Migraine in women

    Migraine affects 10% people in the world, and is the 6th leading cause of disabling disorders world over, as per the WHO – and women are more often and more severely afflicted by it! If that were not all, it is more complicated to treat women with migraine because of pregnancy, childbirth, and lactation issues due to which many medications cannot be administered! In this video, the first of many that I will do on this topic, I touch upon a few simple pointers on this very important and sensitive issue.

    Migraine pathophysiology

    The video below is for medical professionals, contains quite a bit of jargon; but for medicos, it is an excellent tool to understand the basic changes which happen in the brain in the immediate prelude to a migraine, the neurotransmitters involved, etc. I was especially delighted by the visual which shows the spreading cortical depression in migraine; more about it later!

    This is a youtube video from a youtube channel called cure4migraine


    I’m 20 years boy and I’m suffering from severe headache it starts during night about 11 pm and continue till 3 am. Basically at night and headache in back side of head feeling like hammering in my back head ,also feel weak in morning and can’t sleep at night .Plzz help.

    Answer: Your headache could be a variant of “Cluster Headache”; however, to be certain, I would need more data. So let me give you some general information and advise.

    Cluster headache is similar to, but no the same as, Migraine.

    Both of these conditions are distinct disease entities, unrelated to anything else; that means that they are not caused by something else. This is an important point to understand, since many of my patients have this concern, “Is my headache due to a brain tumor?”; or, “Is my headache due to removal of my tooth which I did a few days ago?” and so on.

    Those situations are called “Secondary Headache”, meaning the headaches are Secondary to some other problem; contrast this with Migraine or Cluster Headache, which are called Primary, meaning the problem is the headache itself, and not secondary to some other problem.

    Cluster Headaches, like Migraine, also do not lead to some other condition; for example, a few people come to me with this concern: “Doctor, I have had this headache for a few years, but it has been getting worse over the years; now I am worried that if I keep getting headaches like this, I will get some brain damage. Is that true?”

    Substitute brain tumor, dementia, Alzheimer, memory disturbance – and a few other things, and that will cover the usual concerns people do have.

    So let me clear it up here: repeated attacks of migraine and cluster headaches WILL NOT lead to any of those conditions.

    Now, once we are clear about the similarities between Cluster Headaches and Migraine, one needs to understand the DIFFERENCES as well.
    Migraine typically lasts between 4 hours to 72 hours; Cluster headaches are much shorter, usually lasting 45 mins to a maximum of 3 hours.
    Migraine usually recur over longer intervals, such as days or weeks, though it can get converted into a daily headache as well; Cluster Headache, in contrast, have a very different frequency – in fact, this is the reason for the name.

    Typically, Cluster Headaches occur daily for a certain period of time – for example one week, or a few weeks, or a month – and then stop completely. They may recur after a variable period, usually an year later.

    So patient’s of Cluster Headaches sometimes recollect having such clusters in the past. Sometimes it is seasonal – occurring every summer, for example. They occur everyday, practically at the same time, and last exactly the same length of time – the stereotypical attacks.

    During a Cluster headache, the pain is USUALLY but not always – over the forehead, on one or the other side, or around an eye; it may cause intense, boring pain in the eye or behind the eye, and be associated with congestion and watering in the eye.

    So based on some of the points you mentioned in your question, I feel you may have cluster headache – but we can be sure only if you provide more details about your headaches.


    What causes headaches every day?

    This was a question asked on http://www.quora.com

    Headaches that occur frequently and daily be simply migraines which have become worse; but if it is a new headache, or there is a significant change in your headache pattern, then you need to take it more seriously. To learn more about this, see my answer to this question, by moving the mouse over this text:

    Rajshekher Garikapati, Specialist in Medicine and Neurology Answered Jul 21, on http://www.Quora.com

    There are two parts to the question – What causes headaches? And what causes them everyday – because they are interrelated.

    The commonest causes of headache include Migraine and Tension – Type Headache. These are simply labels used by doctors dealing with these problems, for want of anything better.

    There are a few things common to these, and listing them here will give you a good start in understanding things.

    • These headaches are conditions, or disorders, in themselves (which means, they are not caused by another underlying disorder like tumor, infection, and so on); in scientific parlance, these are called Primary Headaches.
    • Both Migraine and TTH are considered “benign disorders”, because they have not been clearly linked to any significant brain damage, degeneration of development o any other serious or life-threatening condition.
    • There is genetic-linkage to both of these, though more thoroughly researched for migraine; that doesn’t mean the same as hereditary, in which a sufferer or victim passes on the trait or disease to his or her offspring.
    • Both of these conditions start at some point in life, continue for a few years or decades, waxing and waning over the course of life, and then subside at a variable period of time.

    Here are a few differences:

    • Migraine tends to be an “attack disorder” – meaning that headaches come in sudden episodes, rise up in severity to a point, before subsiding. TTH, on the other hand, tends to be less intense, but lasts longer, generally never reaching a peak, and subsiding only gradually, if at all.
    • Migraine, in its greatest intensity, can be very incapacitating, leading to vomiting, obtundation, mood changes (anhedonia), inability to work, read, or enjoy; TTH never reaches that kind of intensity, and causes trouble by being nagging and niggling for long periods of time.
    • Migraine tends to respond better to various available treatments; TTH has poorer response in general.
    • Migraine tends to increase in intensity, duration, and frequency over a period of time, to a point where it may become a “Chronic Daily Headache”; TTH has a higher propensity to become a CDH.

    Here is where the second part of your question comes in; why do these headaches become CDHs? The mechanisms have been worked out to a certain extent, but may be of little benefit to lay people, especially since it is not fully understood by scientists and doctors.

    More important (to you) would be – under what circumstances, or what triggers these headache to become CDHs?

    With migraine, the observation is that chronic neglect of the headache generally leads to it. Neglect has several connotations to it: firstly, not giving it the importance it deserves – consequently, never seeking medical help; not taking the medications appropriately – either due to negligence, or because of side-effects, or from fear of adverse reactions.

    Treatments are not perfect, but adhering to the prescription will give you a better response than being random with the treatment. But even meticulously following the prescription does not prevent the conversion in all cases; you can call it an idiosyncrasy of that individual, which is the same as saying “I don’t know.” But you can still treat them effectively, without pharmaceutical support, but that ought to be the subject of a separate discussion!

    What does a headache occurring often and in the same place on the head mean?

    This was a question asked on http://www.quora.com

    Headaches that always affect the same spot on the head could herald a sinister cause inside the head; they should be evaluated properly. To learn more about this, see my answer to this question, by moving the mouse over this text:

    Rajshekher Garikapati, Specialist in Medicine and Neurology Answered Jul 21, on http://www.Quora.com

    Headaches can be due to many causes; tumors are rare causes, but pre-eminent in anyone’s list owing to their lethal significance.

    A clinician needs clues to conclude that a sufferer’s symptoms could be due to such kinds of serious maladies, rather than the comparatively less serious conditions, like migraine.

    There is a dictum that headache specialists follow, and is possibly a good answer to your question:

    • (1) A new-onset headache, or
    • (2) Significant Change in the pattern of an existing headache

    Either of the above situations warrants further evaluation with a Brain scan.

    The devil, as always, lies in the details: what constitutes a “significant change” is defined, albeit unavoidably, with less precision than one would want.

    To put it succinctly: change in frequency, severity, duration, quality of pain, location, response to treatment, precipitating and relieving factors – one of these, or any random combination of these could be enough to trigger warning bells.

    A change, to be significant, should also not be transitory; it needs to be there for some time before importance should be attached to it.So as you can see: it’s based on one’s judgement, and is individualized.

    From my experience, the intensity of pain has very low correlation with the seriousness of the underlying illness: migraines can cause severe pain, whereas tumors may produce none at all.

    Pain is subjective, varying from person to person, and a majority of the times, reflects the tolerance – or lack of it – to pain.

    In short: meet a doctor, and let him (or her) do the worrying!!

     

    Is it common for migraine sufferers to have non headache migraines?

    Rajshekher Garikapati, Specialist in Medicine and Neurology

    The International Headache Society (yes, there is a body of doctors with that ominous-sounding name, and no, they are not tasked with anything nefarious) has classified migraines to include the variety you are talking about, as Migraine Aura without Headache, or, another category, called Migraine Equivalent.

    These are not arbitrary or whimsical – it is not uncommon for people to report that they had an aura but it wasn’t followed by the Headache, or that they had a mild premonition which was not followed by the headaches but other migraine concomitants, such as nasal stuffiness, nausea, photophobia, and so on.

    These may sometimes go unnoticed, or the patient may attribute it to a mental feat! Yes, you can train yourself NOT to have migraine – but that’s another story!


    Why do I have headaches above my left eye frequently?

    There are many possible causes; the focus, at first, would be to rule out conditions which can be a potential threat. Above the eye, sinus and eye conditions would have to be considered first, followed by local conditions of the integument (muscle, bone, soft tissue), and finally intracranial conditions, including brain.

    Once these have been thoroughly ruled out, the conclusion would be that it is one of the migraine-like conditions, which includes cluster headache.

    Since treatment would depend on an exact diagnosis, the best person to do so would be a doctor who examines you.

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